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This overlay needed a few lacquer drop fills because of some small holes in the finish...they were small trench-like dents that occurred as I was adding more and more coats. I sprayed my nitro lacquer in a little cup, let it thicken for 20-30 mins, and then drop filled twice on each blemish.

They appeared to be completely gone while I was wet sanding. I went all the way up to 2000 grit and then buffed with ColorTone Fine compound followed by swirl remover using a rotary foam pad. I noticed these little blemishes after my final polishes...

Any idea why these appeared? Suggestions for removing them? See the attached photo.

Solved: Turns out that the "blemishes" were very small and very shallow craters in the finish that resulted from the drop fills. The finishing compound got stuck in these and dried...so what I thought was a blemish was just dried finishing compound. I took a safety pin, dipped it in naphta, and gently scraped up the dried compound (while taking extreme caution not to scratch outside of the hole or chip away any finish with the help of a magnifying visor).

After that I placed a drop of naphta on top of each hole to clean out any remaining compound and wiped with a microfiber cloth to reach the inside of the holes as much as possible. The compound is completely gone and the holes are invisible.

Thanks again everyone.

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Peter.

If polishing compound is causing this.

And this is a Repair for a Client or an Instrument that you are Fabricating to Sell.

The way to think about this (in my personal opinion, others will have their own) is that Removing the Compound, Doesn't Fix the Problem.

The Real Problem is, the Initial Contamination that has caused the Holes, that allows the Polishing Compound to be Trapped, and become Rather Difficult to Remove.

And the Salient Point, that if you don't Properly Address Contaminating Defects in your Finish, they have a disconcerting way, of eventually Raising their Hoary Head, and can Later Become something of an Embarrassment.

If you think of the Issue from the Point of View of Your Customer, rather than from the point of view of what is Convenient to you. You will realise that if you Remove the Polishing Compound Trapped in the Tiny Holes, the Compounds Light Colour has Highlighted.

But Don't Correct what are in Reality,  Inherent Defects in the Finish Quality. When the Customer Polishes his Instrument, and let's say he uses something commonly used such on Guitars, such as Carnauba Wax. As soon as he does, the Holes will once again Trap the Bright White Polish and Immediately Highlight and Flag Up the Known Fault, that You have Neglected to Address.

At that Point you will either attempt to Talk Your Way out of Owning the Problem, A Genuine, Known Fault with a Subsequent Loss of Good Reputation, or Address the Issue but with Greater Difficulty, because of All The Polishing that will have been Enacted to Address and Rectify the Issue by the Owner, that have Added Unwanted Elements to the Holes and Surface that subsequently make it More Difficult to Correctly Finish.

 

 

Now it's possible that your Customer will be someone that Doesn't Care too much about his Instrument, never Polishes his Guitar, and is not bothered by Small Defects in the Finish.

The thing is, the Customer might just as easily be Quite the Opposite, and if he's Buying a Individually Made, Craftsman Luthier Built, Instrument. He might Reasonably Expect the Quality of Finish to be Superior, with More Care taken over it,  to that of Commonly Encountered Mass Production Models, rather than Worse.

The Essential Point is, Trapped Wax Compound isn't Really The Problem, it's Actually Merely a Symptom. If you Address the Surface Symptom, yet Fail to Properly Address the Genuine Underlying Problem. Then the Problem will Remain, and sure as eggs are eggs, be Discovered (whether it comes back to you or not) and Become a "Mystery Issue" of the sort that  Provokes, "Word of Mouth" Discussion.

 

 

Therein lies the Danger for anyone hoping to Develop an Sound and Growing Reputation for Good Work.

A Good Reputation is Extremely Hard to Earn, and Incredibly Easy to Quickly Lose.

 

 

Lastly.

And I mean no disrespect whatever to anyone here.

I find it stunningly bewildering, that Defects, folks would Very Harshly Lambast any Major Manufacturer for.

They are Willing to turn a Blind Eye to, when Such Faults are Occur with a Supposedly Skilled Luthiers Work. To Say Don't Worry About It,  and that it is Perfectly Acceptable.

I would have thought that if a Fault is Unacceptable to Someone, when encountered from a Mass Production Manufacturer; Similar Finish Faults should be Equally Unacceptable to Good Luthier or High End Craftsman.

I Reiterate, that No Disrespect is Intended towards Anyone Whatever. Rather, it is that I Personally Struggle to make the Necessary Gymnastic Intellectual Leaps , that Make One Groups, Shipped Defects Totally Unacceptable, but another Groups, Perfectly O.K.

 

Continuing Good Luck with your Luthier Work!

 

P

Solved: Turns out that the "blemishes" were very small and very shallow craters in the finish that resulted from the drop fills. The finishing compound got stuck in these and dried...so what I thought was a blemish was just dried finishing compound. I took a safety pin, dipped it in naphta, and gently scraped up the dried compound (while taking extreme caution not to scratch outside of the hole or chip away any finish with the help of a magnifying visor).

After that I placed a drop of naphta on top of each hole to clean out any remaining compound and wiped with a microfiber cloth to reach the inside of the holes as much as possible. The compound is completely gone and the holes are invisible.


Thanks again for all the help.

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