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http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=69158&cat=51&ap=2

Has anyone tried this glue or see any potential problems with it regarding using it as an alternative to hide glue?

Here is the description:

"Developed by noted restorer and marquetry expert Patrick Edwards, this glue provides the benefits of traditional hide glue in a convenient and easy-to-use liquid formulation. It has good initial tack, a 30-minute open time, and is reversible with heat and moisture – ideal properties for restoration, veneering, instrument making or assembling complex projects. Smears and bleed-through can be removed with a damp cloth, making for easy clean-up prior to finishing."

"Composed of hydrolyzed collagen (hide glue) and urea, the glue cures through evaporation and sets completely in 24 to 48 hours. Non-toxic, it has a 192g Bloom strength rating and a 1-year shelf life that can be extended by refrigeration. Available in 5 fl oz (148ml) and 20 fl oz (591ml) bottles."

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Liquid hide glue has been around a long time, and it works very well, although its shelf life is something to watch closely.  The gel extender (urea, in this case) causes a slow degradation of the strength.  Franklin liquid hide glue now comes with age-dating for just that reason.

All my first instruments were stuck together with Franklin liquid hide glue, and until I encountered a bad batch, I also used if for repairs.  Those instruments are holding up very well with never a sign of glue failure after better than 40 years.

I still use it occasionally, but my go-to hide glue is still the hot stuff.  It has an initial grab that's hard to beat,

Is the process of adding a gel extender within the capabilities of the home workshop? It seems to me that that way I could have the best of both worlds. I'd know when I made it and how long to give it shelf space and if I needed the quick grab I could always go hot.

Fine Woodworking has had many features over the years; here's one that came up on the first Google:

http://www.finewoodworking.com/Materials/MaterialsPDF.aspx?id=2519

I did a google search myself. Here are a couple of pages that don't require membership.

http://www.popularwoodworking.com/article/hide-glue-in-liquid-form

This one adds table salt and is very simple.

http://www.blendedwoodworking.com/?p=823

This one gives details of how to use urea. Not having urea to hand I'll give the salt method a try and report back in a few days.

I've had good luck with Old Brown Glue. Like anything it has taken a little time to learn how to work with it. I still use glue from the pot for many things but Old Brown Glue has worked well when I need the extra open time. Most of the joints where I would be concerned about strength don't require long open time so I still go to the glue pot for them.

"Hide Glue: Historical & Practical Applications by Stephen Shepherd has some great information about using hide glue, working with additives, etc.

http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com//Merchant/merchant.mvc?Screen=PR...

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